South of Gold Mountain ~ AZ Residency by H.T. Chen & Dancers

 

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March 23-28, 2015

H.T. Chen & Dancers AZ Residency

Desert Dance Theatre presents NYC dance company, H.T. Chen & Dancers in a week-long residency of community outreach activities, school performance and workshops from March 23-28, 2015. The week-long residency will culminate in featured performances of SOUTH OF GOLD MOUNTAIN at the Tempe Center for the Arts – Theater on Friday, March 27 and Saturday, March 28, 2015 at 7:30pm.

Click Here to Download: SGM Press Release (Updated)

Click Here to Download: SGM Press Release (in Chinese)

 

DESERT DANCE THEATRE presents H.T. Chen & Dancers

WHAT? South of Gold Mountain

WHEN? Friday, March 27 and Saturday, March 28, 2015 at 7:30pm

WHERE? Tempe Center for the Arts – Theater

700 West Rio Salado Parkway, Tempe, Arizona 85281

COST? $18 Adult, $15 Senior, $13 Student, $12 Group of 10+,

$10 Friends of Desert Dance Theatre (FDDT)

TICKETS? TCA Box Office: 480-350-2822 (480-350-2TCA) or www.tempe.gov/tca (Service and convenience fees may apply)

QUESTIONS? Desert Dance Theatre, 480-962-4584 or lisa@desertdancetheatre.org.

 

Enjoy these video teasers of SOUTH OF GOLD MOUNTAIN by Nel Shelby Productions #htchenanddancers Chen Dance Center / H.T. Chen & Dancers

TWO MINUTE TRAILER: https://vimeo.com/chendancecenter/sgmtrailer

SHORT VIDEO CLIP: https://vimeo.com/chendancecenter/sgmpromo

Between Heaven and Earth Crpd

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

(Schedule subject to change. Please check back for updates.)

Monday, March 23 (12:00pm-1:20pm) – Dance Master Class at Paradise Valley Community College, 18401 N 32nd St, Phoenix (Closed)

Tuesday, March 24 (11:00am-11:30am) – “Dance as a Profession” Lecture at Paradise Valley Community College, 18401 N 32nd St, Phoenix (Closed)

Tuesday, March 24 (1:00pm-2:45pm) – Dance Master Class at Saguaro Hall Dance Studios, Grand Canyon University, 3300 W Camelback Road, Phoenix

Wednesday, March 25 (11:15 am-12:15pm) – Nutrition for Dancers: Eating for Energy with Joanie Johnson at Saguaro Hall Dance Studios, Grand Canyon University, 3300 W Camelback Road, Phoenix

Wednesday, March 25 (6:00pm-7:30pm) – FREE Dance Master Class at Dance Theater West, 3925 E Indian School Rd, Phoenix ~ Sponsored by Arizona Dance Education Organization (AzDEO) http://azdeo.org/

Friday, March 27 (9:30am-10:15am) – Lecture Demonstration/School Performance at Skyline Education ~ South Valley Preparatory & Arts School, 7450 S. 40th Street, Phoenix ~ Co-sponsored by Arizona Dance Coalition (ADC) http://www.azdancecoalition.org/ (Closed)

Friday, March 27 (7:30pm) –  “South of Gold Mountain” – Featured Performance at Tempe Center for the Arts, 700 West Rio Salado Parkway, Tempe, Arizona 85281 ~ Post-show Q & A Guest Speakers: John Jung (Author of “Chopsticks in the Land of Cotton”),  Barry Wong (former AZ Legislator and Corporation Commissioner), Dr. Wei Li (Professor at ASU Asian Pacific American Studies / School of Social Transformation, and School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning)

Saturday, March 28 (7:30pm) –  “South of Gold Mountain” – Featured Performance at Tempe Center for the Arts, 700 West Rio Salado Parkway, Tempe, Arizona 85281 ~ Post-show Q & A Guest Speakers: John Jung (Author of “Chopsticks in the Land of Cotton”), Carolyn Hong Chan (Past National President of Chinese American Citizens Alliance), Tony Q. Chan (Board of Trustees of the American Optometric Association)

(Schedule subject to change. Please check back for updates.)

TRANSPARENT HINGES crpd

 

“SOUTH OF GOLD MOUNTAIN”

Desert Dance Theatre will present H.T. Chen and Dancers in the featured performance of “South of Gold Mountain” on Friday, March 27th and Saturday, March 28, 2015 at 7:30pm at Tempe Center for the Arts Theater.

South of Gold Mountain is a multimedia dance piece based on research conducted by H.T. Chen and Dian Dong while traveling the southern states. The production incorporates blues, traditional music, oral histories, childhood songs and stories in Toishanese, and contemporary music all assembled by sound designer, James Lo, video footage of historic photographs, and a multi-generational, multi-cultural cast of performers from New York and the local community. The interviews they conducted, and the oral histories created, were about the Chinese immigrant community that came to the South in the late 19th – early 20th centuries. Many of the interviewees were part of this society during the period leading up to World War II. Their parents and grandparents came initially as inexpensive/indentured laborers who effectively replaced the slaves in the field post-Civil War. And they then went on to become shopkeepers and entrepreneurs opening businesses that replaced the plantation commissaries.

In addition to the featured presentation, we have invited leaders of the Arizona Asian Community, such as CACA, AAAA, and OCA to attend and participate in the Q & A session at the end of the event. Our special guest speaker at the Q & A will feature John Jung, author of “Chopsticks in the Land of Cotton” and many other books that refer to the Chinese American experience in the South. Pre-order book online in advance for book signing: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B001IXO5CW.

 POST-SHOW Q & A ~ GUEST SPEAKERS

FRIDAY, MARCH 27

JOHN JUNG is a retired psychology professor from California State University, Long Beach.  In retirement, he reflected on the lives of his immigrant parents and their children, the only Chinese in Macon, Georgia, when they operated a laundry from the 1920s to 1950s before the civil rights era.  Thinking about what it means to be “Chinese” when everyone else is either “black or white” led to a memoir, Southern Fried Rice: Life in A Chinese Laundry in the Deep South (2005).    

Writing this memoir stimulated Jung to do extensive research about Chinese American history to understand the key role that the laundry business played in their economic success, leading to Chinese Laundries: Tickets to Survival on Gold Mountain (2007) which blends historical events and issues with narratives written by those who grew up in laundries describing the lives of laundrymen and their families. Using a similar approach, he examined the origins and significance of Chinese family restaurants in Sweet and Sour: Life in Chinese Family Restaurants (2010).

Chopsticks in the Land of Cotton: Lives of Mississippi Delta Chinese Grocers (2008) is a social history of the immigrant Chinese and their families who operated grocery stores in the Mississippi Delta for much of the past century. Interviews and the oral history holdings at Delta State University’s Archives & Museum provided first-hand accounts.  Jung developed working relationships with many of these individuals and noted, “I hope this book can help preserve some of this rich history that is unknown to most Americans, even those of Chinese ancestry.”

His latest book, A Chinese American Odyssey: How A Retired Psychologist Makes A Hit As An Historian (2014) provides an overview of the creative process involved in conceptualizing and writing his four books on Chinese American history.

MADELINE ONG-SAKATA is the Executive Director and Secretary of the Asian Chamber of Commerce and is publisher/editor of the Chamber’s monthly newspaper, Asian SUNews. Madeline has been in this position for the last 21 years and was one of the founders of Asian Chamber of Commerce and original publisher of the Asian SUNews. Prior to Asian Chamber of Commerce, Madeline spent most of her time as a community activist and found that Asian Chamber and especially Asian SUNews gave her the opportunity to continue her work as a community activist with a greater impact. She is also a housewife and cared for her three young grandsons, now ages 7, 13 and 16, and her husband until his death in 2008 and her granddaughter until age four.  She has 5 grown daughters and one grown son; fourteen grandchildren three of them are identical triplet girls.

Madeline was born in Phoenix, Arizona but grew up in San Francisco, California, attending Lowell High School in San Francisco and North Phoenix H.S and Phoenix College. Her political awareness comes naturally since her father was the first Asian American elected to public office in 1946. He was elected to the Arizona House in 1946 and to the Arizona Senate in 1960.  At a very young age Madeline learned grass roots campaigning and the importance of political involvement from her father and community involvement from her mother. 

She was the Past President of Chinese American Citizens Alliance, Arizona Asian American Association, and City of Phoenix Pacific Rim Advisory Council Commissioner,  Board member of the following organizations: Asian Chamber of Commerce, Pacific Rim Advisory Council, Arizona State University Minority Council, Charter member of the FBI Citizens Academy, National Japanese American Museum Board of Governors. 

Affiliations: Pan Asian Community Alliance Tucson, Japanese American Citizens League AZ,  Arizona State University (ASU) Asian LEAD Academy, ASU Asian Pacific American Students Coalition, ASU Asian Pacific American Studies Program

Madeline’s proudest accomplishment is her involvement in persuading Arizona State University to offer Asian Pacific American Studies to their students and ten years later, due to her persistence to ASU officials make APA Studies a major. Her work with young students and young adults gives her the most satisfaction.  Madeline was nominated Woman of the Year by the Arizona Business Journal along with 3 others including then Gov. Janet Napolitano who won; Madeline was awarded Community Honoree by the Japanese American Citizens League Southwest District in 2011.  These two awards are among many.

BARRY WONG, a native Phoenician, is a longtime community leader, lawyer and public figure.  He is a son of immigrant parents from Canton, China who arrived to Phoenix in the early 1950s where they started a neighborhood grocery business and raised six children.  They were preceded to America by Barry’s paternal grandparents, and his great great grandfather was among the Chinese laborers who helped build the Transcontinental Railroad.  Barry was a legislator in the Arizona House of Representatives for four terms (1993-2000) and a commissioner on the statewide utility regulating Arizona Corporation Commission.  He continues to be active in the community including as chairman of the Arizona Republican Party Asian American Coalition, advisor to the Arizona Asian American Association and life member of the Fiesta Bowl Organization.

WEI LI received her Bachelor and Master degrees in Beijing, China; and her Ph.D. in geography at the University of Southern California in 1997. She is a Professor at the Asian Pacific American Studies / School of Social Transformation, and School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning in the Arizona State University, USA. 

Her foci of research are urban ethnicity and ethnic geography, highly-skilled international migration and transnational connections, financial sector and minority community development, focusing on the Chinese and other Asian groups in the Pacific Rim. Her research has been funded by US National Science Foundation, Canada-US Fulbright Foundation, and the Government of Canada. She is the author of “Ethnoburb: The New Ethnic Community in Urban America” (2009; paperback 2012; The 2009 Book Award in Social Sciences, Association for Asian American Studies); editor of “From Urban Enclave to Ethnic Suburb: New Asian Communities in Pacific Rim Countries” (2006; both from University of Hawaii Press); co-editor of “Immigrant Geographies of North American Cities” (2012; Oxford University Press), “Landscape of Ethnic Economy” (2006; Rowman and Littlefield) and two journal theme issues, and (co-)author) of other 88 scholarly articles. 

She was a member of the U.S. Census Bureau’s Race and Ethnic Advisory Committees on the Asian Population, served as its elected Chair (2010-2012) and vice chair (2004-2009). She was the Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Queen’s University, Canada (2006-2007), among the inaugural class of the National Asia Research Associates with the National Bureau of Asian Research and Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (2010-2011); and received the Rockefellor Foundation Bellagio Writing Residency (2014). She is a member of the International Steering Committee of the International Metropolis Project, and the North American Director for the International Society of Studying Chinese Overseas.

 

SATURDAY, MARCH 28

JOHN JUNG is a retired psychology professor from California State University, Long Beach.  In retirement, he reflected on the lives of his immigrant parents and their children, the only Chinese in Macon, Georgia, when they operated a laundry from the 1920s to 1950s before the civil rights era.  Thinking about what it means to be “Chinese” when everyone else is either “black or white” led to a memoir, Southern Fried Rice: Life in A Chinese Laundry in the Deep South (2005).    

Writing this memoir stimulated Jung to do extensive research about Chinese American history to understand the key role that the laundry business played in their economic success, leading to Chinese Laundries: Tickets to Survival on Gold Mountain (2007) which blends historical events and issues with narratives written by those who grew up in laundries describing the lives of laundrymen and their families. Using a similar approach, he examined the origins and significance of Chinese family restaurants in Sweet and Sour: Life in Chinese Family Restaurants (2010).

Chopsticks in the Land of Cotton: Lives of Mississippi Delta Chinese Grocers (2008) is a social history of the immigrant Chinese and their families who operated grocery stores in the Mississippi Delta for much of the past century. Interviews and the oral history holdings at Delta State University’s Archives & Museum provided first-hand accounts.  Jung developed working relationships with many of these individuals and noted, “I hope this book can help preserve some of this rich history that is unknown to most Americans, even those of Chinese ancestry.”

His latest book, A Chinese American Odyssey: How A Retired Psychologist Makes A Hit As An Historian (2014) provides an overview of the creative process involved in conceptualizing and writing his four books on Chinese American history.

CAROLYN HONG CHAN, born in Greenville, MS, attended grades 1-5 at the Oriental School.  From 1947 on, she attended 6th grade at Court School, and Greenville Jr-Senior High School, and graduated from Mississippi University for Women.  Her experiences in the Jim Crow era motivated her to become an activist for justice and equality.  She has served as chair of the National Advisory Council on Bilingual Eduction, president of the Auxiliary to the American Optometric Association, and president of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History Foundation.  A New Mexico resident since 1959, she helped repeal the Alien Land Law from the New Mexico Constitution.  National president of the Chinese American Citizens Alliance (C.A.C.A.) from 2009-2013, she led the Alliance’s crucial role in the 1882 Project.  The coalition of five national Asian American organizations, the 1882 Project obtained unanimous passage of resolutions in the US Congress that expressed regret for the 1882 Chinese Act and other exclusion laws that made Chinese “forbidden citizens” for more than 60 years.

TONY Q. CHAN, O.D., was born in Boston, graduated from Ruleville, MS High School, attended George Washington University, and obtained B.S. and O.D. degrees from Illinois College of Optometry.  The first Asian American optometrist licensed in New Mexico, he is, thus far, the only Asian American elected to the Board of Trustees of the American Optometric Association. He helped shape his profession through Lionism, as president of the Alumni Council and trustee at ICO, and service on the National Eye Advisory Council of the National Eye Institute.  He served many years as a Grand Executive on the national board of the Chinese American Citizens Alliance and was effective in garnering Congressional support for H. Res. 415, which honored and recognized the contributions of Chinese and Asian/Pacific Islander Civil War veterans.

“This production is close to my heart because it is about my family in Mississippi where I was born and raised, and others like me whose families migrated to the Southern United States before WWII.” ~ Lisa R. Chow

 

For more information call Desert Dance Theatre, 480-962-4584. For more information on H.T. Chen & Dancers please visit: www.ChenDanceCenter.org. For tickets: TCA Box Office: 480-350-2822 or www.tempe.gov/tca.

NEFA_white_RGB_small_0The week-long residency and presentation of South of Gold Mountain by H.T. Chen & Dancers was made possible by the New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, with additional support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Your donation will help off-set expenses for production, outreach activities, and will match grant funds from the New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project. Your donation is greatly appreciated and will help us to continue other programs like this in the future.

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For more information call Desert Dance Theatre, 480-962-4584 or go to www.DesertDanceTheatre.org. For more information on H.T. Chen & Dancers please visit: www.ChenDanceCenter.org. For tickets: TCA Box Office: 480-350-2822 or www.tempe.gov/tca.